Trio Khaldei

Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

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Shostakovich & Prokofiev

Shostakovich & Prokofiev

S. Prokofiev Ballade 
S. Prokofiev 5 Mélodies 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.2 in e 

The programme from our first CD. Two magnificent but under-performed duos by Prokofiev, the first early trio by Shostakovich and his captivating second trio, a favourite in Trio Khaldei’s repertoire.

The Piano Trio No. 1 is one of Shostakovich’s true early works and is filled with the romanticism and passion of the composer’s first amorous encounter. This short, one-movement piece contains many features characteristic of Shostakovich’s later works, such as snatches of humour, agitated piano passages, persistent chordal passages and sometimes uncomfortable dissonances but these give way to two extended melodies juxtaposing lyricism and exasperated anticipation.

Little of this romantic vigour remains in the second Piano Trio, a product not of love, but of war. The full sound of the cello in the first trio is markedly different from the fragile and barely audible introduction, played by the cello in harmonics, to the second trio. The work leaves a haunting void in its wake; an emptiness that Shostakovich himself experienced when one of his most versatile and brilliant friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, passed away while the trio was being composed. It is to Sollertinsky that the trio is dedicated, making this masterpiece almost a requiem.

The atmosphere created in the two Prokofiev pieces presented here is more in keeping with that of Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1. This is definitely true in the case of the Ballade for Cello and Piano, one of Prokofiev’s early works. It was written in 1912, when the composer was 21. This one-movement work also has a poetic French title (Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1 was originally entitled Poème), and this immediately gives a narrative element to the music, even if it is not explicit. As is often the case in ballades, the music transports the listener from one atmosphere to the next, punctuating the journey with repeated melodic motifs.

The Five Melodies for Violin and Piano (1925) is an unusual work. The piece was originally written in 1920 for piano and voice without words, using the title ‘Songs without Words’ in its strictest sense. It is precisely this absence of text that makes these pieces so easily adaptable to other instruments. Prokofiev himself arranged a version for violin, at the request of Pavel Kockansky, to whom he dedicated three of the five melodies. 
Text Pieter Bergé

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family business #1 Robert & Clara Schumann

family business #1 Robert & Clara Schumann

R. Schumann  Drei Fantasiestücke
C. Schumann  Trio in g
C. Schumann 3 Romances 
R. Schumann  Trio No. 1 in d

Inaugurating its "Family Business" series, Trio Khaldei dedicates some programs in the following seasons to a few families of musicians, starting with Robert and Clara Schumann. They shared years of love and pain, exercised reciprocal influence and were for one another a never ending source of inspiration. 


Robert Schumann wrote the Drei Fantasiestücke for cello and piano in two days, in February 1849. Originally intended for clarinet and piano, the composer indicated that they could also be performed with viola or cello

Clara’s Piano Trio, composed three years before, is generally considered as one of her finest works. At the time, Robert and Clara were intensively studying Bach's music, inspiring Clara to develop a particular sense of counterpoint in this Trio.

Clara Schumann composed the Three Romances for violin and piano in 1853, and dedicated them to the legendary violinist Josef Joachim. She also performed an extensive tour with him during which she regularly performed her own compositions. A critic wrote about this piece in the Times: "Luxurious and poignant, to hear them we regret that Clara's composition career is subordinated to that of her husband."

Robert wrote his first Piano Trio in 1847, inspired by the one Clara had composed a year earlier. This trio announces a big change in Robert’s composition style, becoming more intellectual, more architectural. He wrote about this : "Before, I was composing almost all my short works in a wave of inspiration. From the year 1845, when for the first time I first elaborated everything mentally, I developed a new style of composition”. A new style that remains very intuitively expressive, traditional in form, but at the same time shows a great inventiveness in the way he eludes the "problems" associated with classical forms.

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Versatile Beethoven

Versatile Beethoven

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Duo in C for violin and cello
Sonata No. 3 for cello and piano in A
Frühlingssonate for violin and piano in F
Geister Trio

Trio Khaldei celebrates Beethoven's 250th birthday with three programs that illustrate the composer's variety of composition styles.


Trio Khaldei likes to extend the boundaries of the trio set-up and brings together in this program pieces for violin and cello, violin and piano, cello and piano and one of Beethoven's most popular piano trios: the Geister Trio. This program gives a wide picture of the evolution in Beethoven's composition style, from classic to revolutionary romantic.

Beethoven originally composed his Duo in C for clarinet and bassoon ; we play the arrangement for violin and cello by F. Hermann. It is not known when Beethoven wrote this work, but it’s clearly an early work in which the influence of Haydn and Mozart is still easily audible.

The Sonata for violin and piano Op. 24a was given the nickname "Springsonata" (Frühlingssonate) after the death of the composer, because of the elegance and joy of life that transpire from it. Once more, Mozart is not far away, but Beethoven experiments with the form: this is the first sonata in four movements instead of the usual three.

The third Cello Sonata and the Geister Trio - both composed in 1808 - are clearly from a mature composer who has found his own voice. Beethoven looked for a long time for the right balance between cello and piano, and in the manuscript we can literally see Beethoven trying to find the ideal distribution of the melodic material between both instruments.

The Geister trio owes its name to Beethoven's pupil Carl Czerny, who wrote that the slow movement reminded him of the ghost scene from Shakespeare's Hamlet. About the trio, E.T.A. Hoffmann wrote : "this music proves that Beethoven’s music has a romantic soul, that resonates in a highly personal, thoughtful and brilliant way."

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Symphonic Beethoven

Symphonic Beethoven

L.v. Beethoven Geister Trio in D
F. Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4 Italian in A
II. Andante con moto ‐ III. Con moto moderato

L.v. Beethoven Symphony No. 7 in A

Trio Khaldei celebrates Beethoven's 250th birthday with three programs that illustrate the composer's variety of composition styles.


It’s a centuries-old practice to arrange great orchestral works for smaller formations. In the past, composers did the arrangements themselves, often out of necessity; before the invention of the gramophone, it was the only way to bring these masterpieces into smaller venues. It remained a common practice even after the invention of the recording. The arrangements invariably cast another light on orchestral pieces that were thought to be known inside out, and they allow this music to be played everywhere. The most famous musics are recognisable by their essence, intensity, colour and intimacy.

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family business #1 Robert & Clara Schumann

family business #1 Robert & Clara Schumann

R. Schumann  Drei Fantasiestücke
C. Schumann  Trio in g
C. Schumann 3 Romances 
R. Schumann  Trio No. 1 in d

Inaugurating its "Family Business" series, Trio Khaldei dedicates some programs in the following seasons to a few families of musicians, starting with Robert and Clara Schumann. They shared years of love and pain, exercised reciprocal influence and were for one another a never ending source of inspiration. 


Robert Schumann wrote the Drei Fantasiestücke for cello and piano in two days, in February 1849. Originally intended for clarinet and piano, the composer indicated that they could also be performed with viola or cello

Clara’s Piano Trio, composed three years before, is generally considered as one of her finest works. At the time, Robert and Clara were intensively studying Bach's music, inspiring Clara to develop a particular sense of counterpoint in this Trio.

Clara Schumann composed the Three Romances for violin and piano in 1853, and dedicated them to the legendary violinist Josef Joachim. She also performed an extensive tour with him during which she regularly performed her own compositions. A critic wrote about this piece in the Times: "Luxurious and poignant, to hear them we regret that Clara's composition career is subordinated to that of her husband."

Robert wrote his first Piano Trio in 1847, inspired by the one Clara had composed a year earlier. This trio announces a big change in Robert’s composition style, becoming more intellectual, more architectural. He wrote about this : "Before, I was composing almost all my short works in a wave of inspiration. From the year 1845, when for the first time I first elaborated everything mentally, I developed a new style of composition”. A new style that remains very intuitively expressive, traditional in form, but at the same time shows a great inventiveness in the way he eludes the "problems" associated with classical forms.

share

Versatile Beethoven

Versatile Beethoven

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Duo in C for violin and cello
Sonata No. 3 for cello and piano in A
Frühlingssonate for violin and piano in F
Geister Trio

Trio Khaldei celebrates Beethoven's 250th birthday with three programs that illustrate the composer's variety of composition styles.


Trio Khaldei likes to extend the boundaries of the trio set-up and brings together in this program pieces for violin and cello, violin and piano, cello and piano and one of Beethoven's most popular piano trios: the Geister Trio. This program gives a wide picture of the evolution in Beethoven's composition style, from classic to revolutionary romantic.

Beethoven originally composed his Duo in C for clarinet and bassoon ; we play the arrangement for violin and cello by F. Hermann. It is not known when Beethoven wrote this work, but it’s clearly an early work in which the influence of Haydn and Mozart is still easily audible.

The Sonata for violin and piano Op. 24a was given the nickname "Springsonata" (Frühlingssonate) after the death of the composer, because of the elegance and joy of life that transpire from it. Once more, Mozart is not far away, but Beethoven experiments with the form: this is the first sonata in four movements instead of the usual three.

The third Cello Sonata and the Geister Trio - both composed in 1808 - are clearly from a mature composer who has found his own voice. Beethoven looked for a long time for the right balance between cello and piano, and in the manuscript we can literally see Beethoven trying to find the ideal distribution of the melodic material between both instruments.

The Geister trio owes its name to Beethoven's pupil Carl Czerny, who wrote that the slow movement reminded him of the ghost scene from Shakespeare's Hamlet. About the trio, E.T.A. Hoffmann wrote : "this music proves that Beethoven’s music has a romantic soul, that resonates in a highly personal, thoughtful and brilliant way."

share

Versatile Beethoven

Versatile Beethoven

LUDWIG VAN BEETHOVEN

Duo in C for violin and cello
Sonata No. 3 for cello and piano in A
Frühlingssonate for violin and piano in F
Geister Trio

Trio Khaldei celebrates Beethoven's 250th birthday with three programs that illustrate the composer's variety of composition styles.


Trio Khaldei likes to extend the boundaries of the trio set-up and brings together in this program pieces for violin and cello, violin and piano, cello and piano and one of Beethoven's most popular piano trios: the Geister Trio. This program gives a wide picture of the evolution in Beethoven's composition style, from classic to revolutionary romantic.

Beethoven originally composed his Duo in C for clarinet and bassoon ; we play the arrangement for violin and cello by F. Hermann. It is not known when Beethoven wrote this work, but it’s clearly an early work in which the influence of Haydn and Mozart is still easily audible.

The Sonata for violin and piano Op. 24a was given the nickname "Springsonata" (Frühlingssonate) after the death of the composer, because of the elegance and joy of life that transpire from it. Once more, Mozart is not far away, but Beethoven experiments with the form: this is the first sonata in four movements instead of the usual three.

The third Cello Sonata and the Geister Trio - both composed in 1808 - are clearly from a mature composer who has found his own voice. Beethoven looked for a long time for the right balance between cello and piano, and in the manuscript we can literally see Beethoven trying to find the ideal distribution of the melodic material between both instruments.

The Geister trio owes its name to Beethoven's pupil Carl Czerny, who wrote that the slow movement reminded him of the ghost scene from Shakespeare's Hamlet. About the trio, E.T.A. Hoffmann wrote : "this music proves that Beethoven’s music has a romantic soul, that resonates in a highly personal, thoughtful and brilliant way."

share