Trio Khaldei

Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

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Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

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Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

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Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

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Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

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Shostakovich & Prokofiev

Shostakovich & Prokofiev

S. Prokofiev Ballade 
S. Prokofiev 5 Mélodies 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.2 in e 

The programme from our first CD. Two magnificent but under-performed duos by Prokofiev, the first early trio by Shostakovich and his captivating second trio, a favourite in Trio Khaldei’s repertoire.

The Piano Trio No. 1 is one of Shostakovich’s true early works and is filled with the romanticism and passion of the composer’s first amorous encounter. This short, one-movement piece contains many features characteristic of Shostakovich’s later works, such as snatches of humour, agitated piano passages, persistent chordal passages and sometimes uncomfortable dissonances but these give way to two extended melodies juxtaposing lyricism and exasperated anticipation.

Little of this romantic vigour remains in the second Piano Trio, a product not of love, but of war. The full sound of the cello in the first trio is markedly different from the fragile and barely audible introduction, played by the cello in harmonics, to the second trio. The work leaves a haunting void in its wake; an emptiness that Shostakovich himself experienced when one of his most versatile and brilliant friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, passed away while the trio was being composed. It is to Sollertinsky that the trio is dedicated, making this masterpiece almost a requiem.

The atmosphere created in the two Prokofiev pieces presented here is more in keeping with that of Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1. This is definitely true in the case of the Ballade for Cello and Piano, one of Prokofiev’s early works. It was written in 1912, when the composer was 21. This one-movement work also has a poetic French title (Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1 was originally entitled Poème), and this immediately gives a narrative element to the music, even if it is not explicit. As is often the case in ballades, the music transports the listener from one atmosphere to the next, punctuating the journey with repeated melodic motifs.

The Five Melodies for Violin and Piano (1925) is an unusual work. The piece was originally written in 1920 for piano and voice without words, using the title ‘Songs without Words’ in its strictest sense. It is precisely this absence of text that makes these pieces so easily adaptable to other instruments. Prokofiev himself arranged a version for violin, at the request of Pavel Kockansky, to whom he dedicated three of the five melodies. 
Text Pieter Bergé

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Shostakovich & Prokofiev

Shostakovich & Prokofiev

S. Prokofiev Ballade 
S. Prokofiev 5 Mélodies 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.2 in e 

The programme from our first CD. Two magnificent but under-performed duos by Prokofiev, the first early trio by Shostakovich and his captivating second trio, a favourite in Trio Khaldei’s repertoire.

The Piano Trio No. 1 is one of Shostakovich’s true early works and is filled with the romanticism and passion of the composer’s first amorous encounter. This short, one-movement piece contains many features characteristic of Shostakovich’s later works, such as snatches of humour, agitated piano passages, persistent chordal passages and sometimes uncomfortable dissonances but these give way to two extended melodies juxtaposing lyricism and exasperated anticipation.

Little of this romantic vigour remains in the second Piano Trio, a product not of love, but of war. The full sound of the cello in the first trio is markedly different from the fragile and barely audible introduction, played by the cello in harmonics, to the second trio. The work leaves a haunting void in its wake; an emptiness that Shostakovich himself experienced when one of his most versatile and brilliant friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, passed away while the trio was being composed. It is to Sollertinsky that the trio is dedicated, making this masterpiece almost a requiem.

The atmosphere created in the two Prokofiev pieces presented here is more in keeping with that of Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1. This is definitely true in the case of the Ballade for Cello and Piano, one of Prokofiev’s early works. It was written in 1912, when the composer was 21. This one-movement work also has a poetic French title (Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1 was originally entitled Poème), and this immediately gives a narrative element to the music, even if it is not explicit. As is often the case in ballades, the music transports the listener from one atmosphere to the next, punctuating the journey with repeated melodic motifs.

The Five Melodies for Violin and Piano (1925) is an unusual work. The piece was originally written in 1920 for piano and voice without words, using the title ‘Songs without Words’ in its strictest sense. It is precisely this absence of text that makes these pieces so easily adaptable to other instruments. Prokofiev himself arranged a version for violin, at the request of Pavel Kockansky, to whom he dedicated three of the five melodies. 
Text Pieter Bergé

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Shostakovich & Prokofiev

Shostakovich & Prokofiev

S. Prokofiev Ballade 
S. Prokofiev 5 Mélodies 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.2 in e 

The programme from our first CD. Two magnificent but under-performed duos by Prokofiev, the first early trio by Shostakovich and his captivating second trio, a favourite in Trio Khaldei’s repertoire.

The Piano Trio No. 1 is one of Shostakovich’s true early works and is filled with the romanticism and passion of the composer’s first amorous encounter. This short, one-movement piece contains many features characteristic of Shostakovich’s later works, such as snatches of humour, agitated piano passages, persistent chordal passages and sometimes uncomfortable dissonances but these give way to two extended melodies juxtaposing lyricism and exasperated anticipation.

Little of this romantic vigour remains in the second Piano Trio, a product not of love, but of war. The full sound of the cello in the first trio is markedly different from the fragile and barely audible introduction, played by the cello in harmonics, to the second trio. The work leaves a haunting void in its wake; an emptiness that Shostakovich himself experienced when one of his most versatile and brilliant friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, passed away while the trio was being composed. It is to Sollertinsky that the trio is dedicated, making this masterpiece almost a requiem.

The atmosphere created in the two Prokofiev pieces presented here is more in keeping with that of Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1. This is definitely true in the case of the Ballade for Cello and Piano, one of Prokofiev’s early works. It was written in 1912, when the composer was 21. This one-movement work also has a poetic French title (Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1 was originally entitled Poème), and this immediately gives a narrative element to the music, even if it is not explicit. As is often the case in ballades, the music transports the listener from one atmosphere to the next, punctuating the journey with repeated melodic motifs.

The Five Melodies for Violin and Piano (1925) is an unusual work. The piece was originally written in 1920 for piano and voice without words, using the title ‘Songs without Words’ in its strictest sense. It is precisely this absence of text that makes these pieces so easily adaptable to other instruments. Prokofiev himself arranged a version for violin, at the request of Pavel Kockansky, to whom he dedicated three of the five melodies. 
Text Pieter Bergé

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Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

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Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

share

Roots

Roots

J.N. Hummel Trio in F
Z. Kodály Duo for violin and cello
F. Martin Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises
A. Dvorak Trio Dumky

For centuries, composers have been inspired by popular music of every kind, borrowing elements, motifs and themes for use in their own ‘art music’.

Joseph Haydn, the ‘father’ of the string quartet, wrote 45 piano trios! Here is his most well known trio, known as alla zingarese, or the Gypsy. In the last movement, entitled Rondo alla zingarese by Haydn himself, the composer uses many elements that come from Gypsy musicians that he met in Esterhazy’s court.

Zoltán Kodály’s Duo Op. 7, composed in 1914, represents a glorious fusion of elements of Hungarian folklore with more formal structures of Western Classical music. Kodaly spent part of his life travelling across the Hungarian countryside with Béla Bartók, collecting, gathering and analysing the melodies of the people.

Commissioned in 1925 by a rich American amateur musician of Irish origin, Frank Martin’s Trio sur des mélodies populaires irlandaises is based on popular Irish folk tunes. It is inspired by previously unpublished ancient melodies that come from dances as well as songs.

Antonin Dvořak was happy to let traditional Slavic music influence his work. These influences can be seen in one of the favourites of the piano trio repertoire, the Dumky trio. Dumky, plural of dumka, is a diminutive form of the term duma, which refers to epic ballads, specifically a song or lament of captive people. During the 19th Century, Slavic composers used the term duma to indicate a brooding, introspective composition interspersed with cheerful and light sections.

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WWI

WWI

C. Debussy Sonata for violin and piano
G. Enesco Trio in a
C. Debussy Sonata for cello and piano
M. Ravel Trio in a

2018 marks the end of the centenary of the Great War. Here are some of the most beautiful chamber works of the 20th Century, written during this tumultuous period of history.

Claude Debussy composed his Sonata for Violoncello and Piano in a couple of days during the summer of 1915. A title considered for the work was “Pierrot faché avec la lune” (Pierrot argues with the moon. Pierrot here refers to a character from 18th Century French theatre.) Although its form is pure and traditional, the Cello Sonata has an unmistakeably theatrical dimension, evoking a world of humour, sarcasm and fantasy.

Two years later, the composer wrote his Sonata for Violin and Piano, equally as concise as the Cello Sonata, and Debussy’s last major work before his death in 1918. Of the Violin Sonata, Debussy wrote, “This Sonata will be interesting from a documentary point of view and as an example of what may be produced by a sick man in time of war. I dedicate it to those who can read between the staves!”

George Enescu, a Romanian violinist and composer who spent around 60 years in Paris, was one of the best violinists of his time. His music is a wonderful mixture of French impressionism and elements from the popular music of his homeland, as shown in his Trio in a, composed in 1916.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote his Piano Trio in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this rushed departure pushed him to write in five weeks a work that should have taken five months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music. #The inspiration for this work’s musical content comes from different backgrounds, from the Basque dance of the first movement to the Malaysian poetry of the second. Ravel’s genius reveals itself in the way he introduces these elements within the classical four-movement framework.

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Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

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Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

share

Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

share

Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

share

Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

share

Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

share

Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

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Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Symphonic

Symphonic

L.V. Beethoven Symphony No.7
D. Shostakovich Symphony No.15 (arr. V. Derevianko)

with Trio Triatu

Trio Khaldei offers a new perspective on two major works of the symphonic repertoire, and revives a custom that was very popular up to the start of the 20th century – that of arrangement, allowing the audience to discover or rediscover these masterpieces.

In this unique programme, Trio Khaldei brings new life to an old tradition. Before the invention of the gramophone, there were only two ways by which to listen to and discover music: going to concerts or playing an instrument oneself.

Up to well into the 20th century, the great symphonic works used to be transcribed or orchestrated for various chamber formations. In this way, they found their niche in private salons, in rooms of smaller dimensions or on stages devoted to chamber music performance. For the composers, it was a terrific way of having their music heard.

In this programme, Trio Khaldei presents two significant arrangements: an anonymous adaptation of Ludwig van Beethoven’s sublime Seventh Symphony, together with the commanding final Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich, arranged for trio and percussion by the Russian pianist Victor Derevianko.

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Symphonic

Symphonic

L.V. Beethoven Symphony No.7
D. Shostakovich Symphony No.15 (arr. V. Derevianko)

with Trio Triatu

Trio Khaldei offers a new perspective on two major works of the symphonic repertoire, and revives a custom that was very popular up to the start of the 20th century – that of arrangement, allowing the audience to discover or rediscover these masterpieces.

In this unique programme, Trio Khaldei brings new life to an old tradition. Before the invention of the gramophone, there were only two ways by which to listen to and discover music: going to concerts or playing an instrument oneself.

Up to well into the 20th century, the great symphonic works used to be transcribed or orchestrated for various chamber formations. In this way, they found their niche in private salons, in rooms of smaller dimensions or on stages devoted to chamber music performance. For the composers, it was a terrific way of having their music heard.

In this programme, Trio Khaldei presents two significant arrangements: an anonymous adaptation of Ludwig van Beethoven’s sublime Seventh Symphony, together with the commanding final Symphony of Dmitri Shostakovich, arranged for trio and percussion by the Russian pianist Victor Derevianko.

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Shostakovich & Prokofiev

Shostakovich & Prokofiev

S. Prokofiev Ballade 
S. Prokofiev 5 Mélodies 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.2 in e 

The programme from our first CD. Two magnificent but under-performed duos by Prokofiev, the first early trio by Shostakovich and his captivating second trio, a favourite in Trio Khaldei’s repertoire.

The Piano Trio No. 1 is one of Shostakovich’s true early works and is filled with the romanticism and passion of the composer’s first amorous encounter. This short, one-movement piece contains many features characteristic of Shostakovich’s later works, such as snatches of humour, agitated piano passages, persistent chordal passages and sometimes uncomfortable dissonances but these give way to two extended melodies juxtaposing lyricism and exasperated anticipation.

Little of this romantic vigour remains in the second Piano Trio, a product not of love, but of war. The full sound of the cello in the first trio is markedly different from the fragile and barely audible introduction, played by the cello in harmonics, to the second trio. The work leaves a haunting void in its wake; an emptiness that Shostakovich himself experienced when one of his most versatile and brilliant friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, passed away while the trio was being composed. It is to Sollertinsky that the trio is dedicated, making this masterpiece almost a requiem.

The atmosphere created in the two Prokofiev pieces presented here is more in keeping with that of Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1. This is definitely true in the case of the Ballade for Cello and Piano, one of Prokofiev’s early works. It was written in 1912, when the composer was 21. This one-movement work also has a poetic French title (Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1 was originally entitled Poème), and this immediately gives a narrative element to the music, even if it is not explicit. As is often the case in ballades, the music transports the listener from one atmosphere to the next, punctuating the journey with repeated melodic motifs.

The Five Melodies for Violin and Piano (1925) is an unusual work. The piece was originally written in 1920 for piano and voice without words, using the title ‘Songs without Words’ in its strictest sense. It is precisely this absence of text that makes these pieces so easily adaptable to other instruments. Prokofiev himself arranged a version for violin, at the request of Pavel Kockansky, to whom he dedicated three of the five melodies. 
Text Pieter Bergé

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In Memoriam

In Memoriam

D. Shostakovich Trio n.1 Op. 8
D. Shostakovich Trio n.2 Op. 67 
P.I. Tchaikovsky Trio in a Op. 50 

with Liesbeth Devos

The Trio’s name reflects its particular attraction for Russian culture; a concert containing exclusively Russian works was therefore a must in its programming. Much like Evgueni Khaldei, Dmitri Shostakovich often found himself in a delicate position in the face of the soviet regime. This is a virtuosic programme filled with emotion.

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Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

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Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

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Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

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Shostakovich & Prokofiev

Shostakovich & Prokofiev

S. Prokofiev Ballade 
S. Prokofiev 5 Mélodies 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.2 in e 

The programme from our first CD. Two magnificent but under-performed duos by Prokofiev, the first early trio by Shostakovich and his captivating second trio, a favourite in Trio Khaldei’s repertoire.

The Piano Trio No. 1 is one of Shostakovich’s true early works and is filled with the romanticism and passion of the composer’s first amorous encounter. This short, one-movement piece contains many features characteristic of Shostakovich’s later works, such as snatches of humour, agitated piano passages, persistent chordal passages and sometimes uncomfortable dissonances but these give way to two extended melodies juxtaposing lyricism and exasperated anticipation.

Little of this romantic vigour remains in the second Piano Trio, a product not of love, but of war. The full sound of the cello in the first trio is markedly different from the fragile and barely audible introduction, played by the cello in harmonics, to the second trio. The work leaves a haunting void in its wake; an emptiness that Shostakovich himself experienced when one of his most versatile and brilliant friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, passed away while the trio was being composed. It is to Sollertinsky that the trio is dedicated, making this masterpiece almost a requiem.

The atmosphere created in the two Prokofiev pieces presented here is more in keeping with that of Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1. This is definitely true in the case of the Ballade for Cello and Piano, one of Prokofiev’s early works. It was written in 1912, when the composer was 21. This one-movement work also has a poetic French title (Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1 was originally entitled Poème), and this immediately gives a narrative element to the music, even if it is not explicit. As is often the case in ballades, the music transports the listener from one atmosphere to the next, punctuating the journey with repeated melodic motifs.

The Five Melodies for Violin and Piano (1925) is an unusual work. The piece was originally written in 1920 for piano and voice without words, using the title ‘Songs without Words’ in its strictest sense. It is precisely this absence of text that makes these pieces so easily adaptable to other instruments. Prokofiev himself arranged a version for violin, at the request of Pavel Kockansky, to whom he dedicated three of the five melodies. 
Text Pieter Bergé

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Apocalypse

Sunday 29 March 201520:00

Hulshout - 

Kleine Katelijnestraat 12 - 2235 Hulshout
google map website

Apocalypse

M. Ravel Trio
O. Messiaen Quatuor pour la fin du temps

with Geert Baeckelandt

In the “Apocalypse” programme, Trio Khaldei interprets two of the all-time masterpieces of the 20th Century. The atmosphere created is spellbinding, and while it evokes the end of the world, it also suggests hope and a longing for a new and better world.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Clarinettist Geert Baeckelandt joins Trio Khaldei for the performance of Olivier Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time. This work was both composed and premiered in wartime (1941), more specifically in the Prisoner of War camp in Görlitz in which Messiaen was imprisoned. As in the trio by Ravel, mysticism and spirituality characterise this work, which takes its inspiration from a quote from the Apocalypse of St John. The première of this quartet took place within the same camp, in gruelling conditions. The work is in eight movements, with certain movements only featuring some of the musicians. The movement for solo clarinet, Abîme des oiseaux, is perhaps the most well known movement of the quartet.

Even today, the performance of the Quartet for the End of Time leaves a lasting impression on the listener.

In this gripping programme, Trio Khaldei translates into music both hope and despair, the beginning and the end, death and eternity.

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Shostakovich & Prokofiev

Shostakovich & Prokofiev

S. Prokofiev Ballade 
S. Prokofiev 5 Mélodies 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.2 in e 

The programme from our first CD. Two magnificent but under-performed duos by Prokofiev, the first early trio by Shostakovich and his captivating second trio, a favourite in Trio Khaldei’s repertoire.

The Piano Trio No. 1 is one of Shostakovich’s true early works and is filled with the romanticism and passion of the composer’s first amorous encounter. This short, one-movement piece contains many features characteristic of Shostakovich’s later works, such as snatches of humour, agitated piano passages, persistent chordal passages and sometimes uncomfortable dissonances but these give way to two extended melodies juxtaposing lyricism and exasperated anticipation.

Little of this romantic vigour remains in the second Piano Trio, a product not of love, but of war. The full sound of the cello in the first trio is markedly different from the fragile and barely audible introduction, played by the cello in harmonics, to the second trio. The work leaves a haunting void in its wake; an emptiness that Shostakovich himself experienced when one of his most versatile and brilliant friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, passed away while the trio was being composed. It is to Sollertinsky that the trio is dedicated, making this masterpiece almost a requiem.

The atmosphere created in the two Prokofiev pieces presented here is more in keeping with that of Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1. This is definitely true in the case of the Ballade for Cello and Piano, one of Prokofiev’s early works. It was written in 1912, when the composer was 21. This one-movement work also has a poetic French title (Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1 was originally entitled Poème), and this immediately gives a narrative element to the music, even if it is not explicit. As is often the case in ballades, the music transports the listener from one atmosphere to the next, punctuating the journey with repeated melodic motifs.

The Five Melodies for Violin and Piano (1925) is an unusual work. The piece was originally written in 1920 for piano and voice without words, using the title ‘Songs without Words’ in its strictest sense. It is precisely this absence of text that makes these pieces so easily adaptable to other instruments. Prokofiev himself arranged a version for violin, at the request of Pavel Kockansky, to whom he dedicated three of the five melodies. 
Text Pieter Bergé

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Shostakovich & Prokofiev

Shostakovich & Prokofiev

S. Prokofiev Ballade 
S. Prokofiev 5 Mélodies 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.1 in C 
D. Shostakovich Trio No.2 in e 

The programme from our first CD. Two magnificent but under-performed duos by Prokofiev, the first early trio by Shostakovich and his captivating second trio, a favourite in Trio Khaldei’s repertoire.

The Piano Trio No. 1 is one of Shostakovich’s true early works and is filled with the romanticism and passion of the composer’s first amorous encounter. This short, one-movement piece contains many features characteristic of Shostakovich’s later works, such as snatches of humour, agitated piano passages, persistent chordal passages and sometimes uncomfortable dissonances but these give way to two extended melodies juxtaposing lyricism and exasperated anticipation.

Little of this romantic vigour remains in the second Piano Trio, a product not of love, but of war. The full sound of the cello in the first trio is markedly different from the fragile and barely audible introduction, played by the cello in harmonics, to the second trio. The work leaves a haunting void in its wake; an emptiness that Shostakovich himself experienced when one of his most versatile and brilliant friends, Ivan Sollertinsky, passed away while the trio was being composed. It is to Sollertinsky that the trio is dedicated, making this masterpiece almost a requiem.

The atmosphere created in the two Prokofiev pieces presented here is more in keeping with that of Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1. This is definitely true in the case of the Ballade for Cello and Piano, one of Prokofiev’s early works. It was written in 1912, when the composer was 21. This one-movement work also has a poetic French title (Shostakovich’s Trio No. 1 was originally entitled Poème), and this immediately gives a narrative element to the music, even if it is not explicit. As is often the case in ballades, the music transports the listener from one atmosphere to the next, punctuating the journey with repeated melodic motifs.

The Five Melodies for Violin and Piano (1925) is an unusual work. The piece was originally written in 1920 for piano and voice without words, using the title ‘Songs without Words’ in its strictest sense. It is precisely this absence of text that makes these pieces so easily adaptable to other instruments. Prokofiev himself arranged a version for violin, at the request of Pavel Kockansky, to whom he dedicated three of the five melodies. 
Text Pieter Bergé

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Apocalypse

Friday 25 April 201420:00

Sint-Niklaas -  CC

Richard Van Britsomstraat 21 - 9100 Sint-Niklaas
google map website

Apocalypse

M. Ravel Trio
O. Messiaen Quatuor pour la fin du temps

with G. Baeckelandt

In the “Apocalypse” programme, Trio Khaldei interprets two of the all-time masterpieces of the 20th Century. The atmosphere created is spellbinding, and while it evokes the end of the world, it also suggests hope and a longing for a new and better world.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Clarinettist Geert Baeckelandt joins Trio Khaldei for the performance of Olivier Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time. This work was both composed and premiered in wartime (1941), more specifically in the Prisoner of War camp in Görlitz in which Messiaen was imprisoned. As in the trio by Ravel, mysticism and spirituality characterise this work, which takes its inspiration from a quote from the Apocalypse of St John. The première of this quartet took place within the same camp, in gruelling conditions. The work is in eight movements, with certain movements only featuring some of the musicians. The movement for solo clarinet, Abîme des oiseaux, is perhaps the most well known movement of the quartet.

Even today, the performance of the Quartet for the End of Time leaves a lasting impression on the listener.

In this gripping programme, Trio Khaldei translates into music both hope and despair, the beginning and the end, death and eternity.

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

share

Colours

Colours

F. Celis Trio Op.5
J. Jongen Trio in b Op.10
M. Ravel Trio in a

This innovative programme is built around one of the masterpieces of the chamber music genre: Maurice Ravel’s Trio. Trio Khaldei is always searching for imaginative programmes in which well-known works appear alongside their lesser-known counterparts. In addition to this trio, they offer the magnificent music of Belgian composers Frits Celis and Joseph Jongen.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Two early works of Belgian composers complete the programme. Joseph Jongen wrote his first Piano Trio in B Minor Op. 1 in 1897 and dedicated it to his father. Flashbacks to German romanticism and French impressionism are scattered throughout this great work, which is in three movements.

Unfortunately, the music of Frits Celis is often underappreciated and not played enough. Trio Khaldei wants to give this Belgian composer the place he deserves. Frits Celis wrote his Trio in 1958. This fifth opus – one of his first compositions – already contains all of the qualities to be found in his later works: a very strong rhythmic tension and clear structure, but above all, a marvellous wide palette of timbres.

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Apocalypse

Apocalypse

M. Ravel Trio
O. Messiaen Quatuor pour la fin du temps

with G. Baeckelandt

In the “Apocalypse” programme, Trio Khaldei interprets two of the all-time masterpieces of the 20th Century. The atmosphere created is spellbinding, and while it evokes the end of the world, it also suggests hope and a longing for a new and better world.

Called to the battlefront in 1914, Maurice Ravel wrote this remarkable work in a great hurry. In a letter to Stravinsky, he confided that this hurried departure pushed him to write in 5 weeks a work that should have taken 5 months. The zeal and urgency of the writing have led to one of the most innovative and coloured pieces in the history of chamber music.

Clarinettist Geert Baeckelandt joins Trio Khaldei for the performance of Olivier Messiaen’s Quartet for the End of Time. This work was both composed and premiered in wartime (1941), more specifically in the Prisoner of War camp in Görlitz in which Messiaen was imprisoned. As in the trio by Ravel, mysticism and spirituality characterise this work, which takes its inspiration from a quote from the Apocalypse of St John. The première of this quartet took place within the same camp, in gruelling conditions. The work is in eight movements, with certain movements only featuring some of the musicians. The movement for solo clarinet, Abîme des oiseaux, is perhaps the most well known movement of the quartet.

Even today, the performance of the Quartet for the End of Time leaves a lasting impression on the listener.

In this gripping programme, Trio Khaldei translates into music both hope and despair, the beginning and the end, death and eternity.

share

Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

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Vienna

Vienna

W.A. Mozart Trio in Bes
J. Brahms Trio No. 2 in C
A. Schönberg Verklärte Nacht

Vienna: the epicentre of three centuries of European music history. This programme offers three works illustrating the soul of this city over time, by three great composers that were born or lived in Vienna: Mozart, Brahms and Schönberg.

At the beginning of this concert, the Khaldei Trio returns to the origins of the piano trio. It was actually in the age of Mozart and Haydn that the genre of the piano trio as we know it now, appeared first. Mozart's Trio KV502 marks a turning point in the evolution of this form: from a more solistic piano part with the violin and violoncello in an accompanying role, it has arrived at a point where the three instruments converse on an equal basis.
The programme continues with one of the greatest composers of the Romantic era, Johannes Brahms. His second trio, composed in Vienna between 1880 and 1882, boasts endless treasures, and Brahms' incomparable talent as a chamber musician makes itself heard.
After the break, the Khaldei Trio interprets Verklärte Nacht (Transfigured Night), Arnold Schönberg's famous piece based on the poem of the same name by Richard Dehmel. The arrangement for trio is by Eduard Steuermann. The composer follows the structure and content of the poem in the music. Nature, guilt, forgiveness and redemption are all entwined in Schönberg’s composition.

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In Memoriam

In Memoriam

D. Shostakovich Trio n.1 Op. 8
D. Shostakovich Trio n.2 Op. 67 
P.I. Tchaikovsky Trio in a Op. 50 

The Trio’s name reflects its particular attraction for Russian culture; a concert containing exclusively Russian works was therefore a must in its programming. Much like Evgueni Khaldei, Dmitri Shostakovich often found himself in a delicate position in the face of the soviet regime. This is a virtuosic programme filled with emotion.

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